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Netflix Rules in Global OTT Demand, But its Lead Is Slipping
Parrot Analytics sees cracks in the Netflix armor: It's still the dominant force in digital original video, but competition is slowly taking its market share.

Netflix is the undisputed king for over-the-top (OTT) video around the globe, but for how much longer? A report released today from industry analysis firm Parrot Analytics said that Netflix commands 64.6% of the demand for digital original series. Parrot surveyed over 100 markets to get its rankings.

News 2A look at two years' worth of data for 10 major markets, however, shows that Netflix's lead is decreasing. For calendar year 2018, Netflix had a demand share of 71%.

For the first time, Netflix's share of demand is under 50% for some combinations of markets and genres. For example, competition for action/adventure titles in the US and Japan has pushed Netflix's demand share to around 47.5%.

After Netflix, Amazon Prime Video has the next highest global demand share for digital originals, with 10.3%, followed by Hulu (7.7%), DC Universe (5.2%), and CBS All Access (4.4%).

In the U.S., drama is the most popular genre for digital originals (35.4% of demand), followed by comedy (23.1%), action/adventure (14.0%), and children (7.5%). The most in-demand subgenre in the U.S. is superhero series,

Parrot's data reflects demand, not views, and the firm often calculates demand scores for series that aren't yet available in a given market. For more data, download The Global Television Demand Report 2019 Q1 for free (registration required).

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